6.04.2018

Orangery Love


On a walk in Thomasville, Georgia in February I spotted an old house with this amazing room. I could not stop staring at its beauty.  It was old and stunning and so full of character. I had no idea what the room was for, what it would have been used for but I knew I truly loved it.  I took this photo so that I could remember it in every detail.

When I got back to the Paxton House I was talking to the innkeeper about the house next door and the amazing room I discovered.  She explained to me that it was called an orangery and was used to house citrus during the winter months.  The orangeries were built to allow for the height of the trees and the glass windows enabled the sun to pour down on the trees giving them plenty of vitamin D. At the end of winter the trees could be taken back out to the garden and the trees would be ready for producing fruit.

After doing a little research I learned that orangeries originated in the 17th Century in Italy and were modernized with architectural developments in Holland as a place to shelter orange trees in the winter.  Moving into the 17th, 18th and 19th centuries orangeries were found on wealthy estates as citrus trees were fashionable among the elite class.  It was crafted of a brick vase and flat roof, it offered natural light during the day and was wired for artificial light at night.  A conservatory, on the contrary, contains a pitched glass roof for natural light both night and day.










Aren't these amazing?  I think they are truly so fabulous and uper chic.  I can just imagine the family that would add one of these to their estate.  As a person who grew up in the world of citrus I love all things citrus related and think this would be the most incredible addition to any home.  If only I had a green thumb to grow my own citrus, or the climate to make it a success.

A girl can dream ... 




Or at least stare at amazing photos of an incredible home with an orangery.

Happy Monday!
 

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